saladinahmed:

Handling harassment, 1940. (from PLANET COMICS)

saladinahmed:

Handling harassment, 1940. (from PLANET COMICS)

(via male-tears)

marvelwomenofcolor:

Scarlet Witch

Salvador Larroca

astonishingx:

Mystique by Pond

astonishingx:

Mystique by Pond

(via comicsuality)

melerio:

Toph the cutie ><

melerio:

Toph the cutie ><

themyskira:

"Heroes shouldn’t have happy personal lives. They are committed to being that person and committed to defending others at the sacrifice of their own personal interests. That’s very important and something we reinforced. People in the Batfamily, their personal lives basically suck.”  Dan Didio

(via fanbingblink)


Donna Troy by Cliff Chiang

Donna Troy by Cliff Chiang

(Source: mytwofavoritexmenaredead, via comicqueens)

sorryexcuseforsorry:
THE IMPORTANCE OF EACH OTHER (2014)

sorryexcuseforsorry:

THE IMPORTANCE OF EACH OTHER (2014)

(via junecovington)

baddroid:Follow the trembling thunder! As a great rumble! WELCOME! Lord of Fear! HAIL!

baddroid:

Follow the trembling thunder! As a great rumble! WELCOME! Lord of Fear! HAIL!

tillythetraveler:Stephanie Brown is the best.

tillythetraveler:

Stephanie Brown is the best.

astrologista:

Amanda Waller - JLU

Leader of Cadmus. Badass lady.

(Source: astrologista, via comicqueens)

femaleleadersinfiction:

Queen Susan the Gentle

Other Titles: Susan Pevensie, Queen Susan of the Horn

Category: Political Leader, Shared Leadership

Appears in: The Chronicles of Narnia" (books, films, television series, radio dramatization, plays)

Ethnicity: British

Religion: Christian

Voiced by: Sophie Cook (1988 BBC television series), Susan Sokol (animated film), Katherine Suchet (2005 audio dramatization)

Portrayed by: Anna Popplewell (“The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe”, child, “Prince Caspian”, “The Voyage of the Dawn Treader”), Sophie Winkleman (“The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe”, adult), Zuleika Robson (1967 serial)

About: "The elder sister and the second eldest Pevensie child….She was the only Pevensie that survived the train wreck (because she was not on the train or at the station) on Earth which sent the others to Narnia during "The Last Battle", and did not return with them to Narnia during that trip (wiki). She was made Queen of Narnia alongside her two brothers and younger sister. She is an excellent archer and a respected monarch. She is also well-known for her beauty, and many suitors seek her hand in marriage. In the most recent film adaptation, a change was made so that Susan entered the battlefield, although she did not do so in the books.

"Throughout ["The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe"] Susan is the voice of caution and common sense…is the most content in positions of ease and comfort, and tends to advise the others to avoid anything unpleasant." Her magical horn becomes an ancient relic used to call for aid.

Susan (or really the writing of her life) has been a long-standing point of contention in the series, relating to the reasons for her exclusion from the final written trip to Narnia. It is still possible that she returned to Narnia after the others, in her own way.

*Primary cast member (“The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe”, “Prince Caspian”) and minor character in “The Voyage of the Dawn Treader”, “The Horse and His Boy” and “The Last Battle”

(Source: rraaaarrl)

davizlopez:

Character sheets for X-Men.

celestedoodles:

a beauxbatons student inspired by this post 

celestedoodles:

a beauxbatons student inspired by this post 

(via fanbingblink)

chirart:I don’t think I can really express the words for how Sailor Moon was so formative to my childhood, for something I don’t think about that deeply anymore. I watched every episode after school faithfully, no matter how many reruns. So faithfully, in fact, that when I missed my first episode I cried for an hour, my nine-year-old heart was so devastated. That’s not an exaggeration, I really did cry into my pillow for an hour. Adorable.
I can also say Sailor Moon was probably what actually got me to want to start drawing cartoons in the way that I do today. I would carefully trace many official pictures just so I can understand Usagi’s design and draw her better. Usagi was kind of my hero, I think. She kind of symbolized what I felt like (and I think what a lot of other girls that age felt like) in that even though you’re a bumbling, dimwitted, goofy nobody… that when it matters—and especially when everything is stacked against you and everyone’s beating you down—you can rise up to be a magnificent princess, take charge, be strong, and you can change the world for the better.
I was teased a lot for liking Sailor Moon as much as I did. But it was the only show growing up that I felt really was about girls and not the IDEA of being girls? Like, I see people criticizing that it’s mostly about boys or food but gosh, the monster of the week episodes always centered around having petty, greedy and outright ugly feelings many people face day to day manipulated to get the better of them, and then a bunch of girls show up from nowhere in awesome outfits to save you from yourself with sparkles and magic and love and leave you happier for it. That’s so fucking awesome. I’m so glad I got to grow up with that.

chirart:

I don’t think I can really express the words for how Sailor Moon was so formative to my childhood, for something I don’t think about that deeply anymore. I watched every episode after school faithfully, no matter how many reruns. So faithfully, in fact, that when I missed my first episode I cried for an hour, my nine-year-old heart was so devastated. That’s not an exaggeration, I really did cry into my pillow for an hour. Adorable.

I can also say Sailor Moon was probably what actually got me to want to start drawing cartoons in the way that I do today. I would carefully trace many official pictures just so I can understand Usagi’s design and draw her better. Usagi was kind of my hero, I think. She kind of symbolized what I felt like (and I think what a lot of other girls that age felt like) in that even though you’re a bumbling, dimwitted, goofy nobody… that when it matters—and especially when everything is stacked against you and everyone’s beating you down—you can rise up to be a magnificent princess, take charge, be strong, and you can change the world for the better.

I was teased a lot for liking Sailor Moon as much as I did. But it was the only show growing up that I felt really was about girls and not the IDEA of being girls? Like, I see people criticizing that it’s mostly about boys or food but gosh, the monster of the week episodes always centered around having petty, greedy and outright ugly feelings many people face day to day manipulated to get the better of them, and then a bunch of girls show up from nowhere in awesome outfits to save you from yourself with sparkles and magic and love and leave you happier for it. That’s so fucking awesome. I’m so glad I got to grow up with that.